Voyager. Oh, shit.

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
3,661
3
0
Massachusetts
#81
6x24 "Life Line" - The Doctor is transmitted back to Earth so he can treat Dr. Zimmerman, who is suffering from a terminal illness. Robert Picardo owns this episode; Zimmerman is totally hilarious. He works incredibly well off of himself, just as Brent Spiner did on TNG. Barclay and Troi return once again, which is fun, though I wish that if they were going to keep going back to the TNG well, they'd bring in Geordi or Data.

6x25 "The Haunting of Deck Twelve" - With main power off-line, Neelix tells the Borg children a ghost story to keep them occupied. Meh. Voyager tries to do a scary ghost story, but ultimately it's just not what these writers are good at. The director tries to compensate, but mostly this episode is a failure.

6x26 "Unimatrix Zero, Part I" - Janeway and Seven of Nine kick-start a Borg civil war when they discover a virtual reality where the drones' original personalities can interact. Good idea, terrrrrrible execution. I've forgiven this show many times before for just saying "fuck it" and going off on some wild adventure, but this one is a total failure. When people on the internet talk about how Voyager de-fanged the Borg, I can't think of a better example than this nonsense episode. For years, assimilation by the Borg is pounded into the audiences' brains as one of the most painful, horrific things that could possibly happen to a person. Picard never got over what happened to him. Here, Janeway, Tuvok and Torres allow themselves to be assimilated which is just a batfuck terrible thing to do. elsewhere, it takes fleets of ships to fight off a single, regular Borg cube. In this episode, Voyager initiates and survives an assault on a Borg tactical cube. This episode sucks.

7x01 "Unimatrix Zero, Part II" - Seven deals with her feelings for some other asshole while Janeway sits down for coffee with the Borg Queen. Second verse, same as the first. This episode sucks, probably even more than the first. It's quite a lucky turn of events that the assimilated crewmembers don't have to have Borg implants permanently stuck in and on their bodies like all the other liberated drones.

7x02 "Imperfection" - Seven's cortical node begins to malfunction, and the crew races to find a replacement before her body shuts down. Meh. This one isn't bad, it just didn't do anything for me. I do like that Icheb is still sticking around and proving to be useful. Voyager's attempts to create more recurring characters is something I wish the show had been doing from the beginning.

7x03 "Drive" - Paris enters the Delta Flyer in an alien race, but stirs up trouble in his relationship with Torres. For much of the time, this episode is a lot of fun. The special effects for the race sequences are really cool, a lot of the dialogue is rather zippy for this show. I like that the show doesn't make a big deal about a wedding for these two, since we already saw it in 'Course: Oblivion', even if that wasn't the real characters.

7x04 "Repression" - Former Maquis crewmembers aboard Voyager are attacked and fall into comas, and Tuvok's investigation comes up with more questions than answers. If this episode had happened earlier in the show's run, it would have been okay. But in season seven, bringing up the old schisms that the show hasn't cared about in a long time, it doesn't really work all that well.

7x05 "Critical Care" - The Doctor is stolen and sold to an alien hospital where patients are only given a level of care deemed appropriate for their contributions to society. This is a pretty fascinating episode; even if the outcome is fairly predictable, it's still really well-written. The Doctor's disdain for unequal healthcare is a great premise for an episode, and thankfully it's competently executed. Too many episodes have good ideas but fall apart in the final product, but not this one.

7x06 "Inside Man" - A hologram of Barclay arrives on Voyager with a plan to get the crew home. Back on Earth, the real Barclay wonders why his hologram never arrived. Another fun TNG crossover episode. Troi appears once again; it seems absurdly lucky that she always seems to be on or near Earth whenever Barclay has one of his breakdowns. Ultimately, the fact that the villains are Ferengi is a little weird, and not entirely successful, but the rest of the episode is fun. A lot of credit to Dwight Schulz, who gets to play two very different Barclays here.

7x07 "Body and Soul" - The Doctor must hide his program inside Seven's body when the Delta Flyer enters the space of an empire at war with their former holographic servants. Another mediocre attempt at comedy. Jeri Ryan does a good job emulating Robert Picardo, and she's clearly having fun, but the script isn't all that spectacular. I'm disappointed that the so-called 'photonic insurgency' is never explored. But then, that idea is the basis of a full two-parter "Flesh and Blood."

7x08 "Nightingale" - Harry Kim inserts himself into an alien war, and finds himself in command of a ship with a prototype cloaking device. I like that this episode finally decides to tackle the idea that Harry has been an ensign for seven years, and gets to take a look at his ambitions for a further career. Disappointingly, the ship he commands is merely a reuse of the CG model for the Federation fighters on 'Deep Space Nine'. Also, 'Firefly' star Ron Glass has a guest starring role, and he does a pretty good job.

7x09/10 "Flesh and Blood" - Voyager answers a distress call, only to discover that the Hirogen have used Voyager's holodeck technology to create vicious, cunning prey who are rebelling against the hunters. At this point, I'm pretty well sick of holograms, though this isn't a bad episode. It has some nice ideas, but they're the same ideas behind every other holographic rights episode. So it all just feels tired and played out, even if it's just the natural progression from a previous episode. But "The Killing Game" is a lot more fun because it's so wild and absurd, while this one just feels rather tame and standard.
 

Arik

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 1, 2010
2,306
1
38
#83
That he just got?

I've had this MacBook Pro for almost two years...I'm still trying to figure it all out. :)

It's sad, though, because I think that scene would be better had the shot bounced off of the doc. Then you have the redneck ask "What are you? Some kind of super man?"
 

Arik

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 1, 2010
2,306
1
38
#87
Actually (and only tangentially related) I just watched Star Trek's The Ultimate Computer the other night. It was kind of interesting watching Kirk and McCoy's reaction to ceding authority to the computer. Which is, essentially, what happens on Voyager with the Doctor.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
3,661
3
0
Massachusetts
#89
Actually (and only tangentially related) I just watched Star Trek's The Ultimate Computer the other night. It was kind of interesting watching Kirk and McCoy's reaction to ceding authority to the computer. Which is, essentially, what happens on Voyager with the Doctor.
The difference there being that they were ordered to submit to an untested device, whereas by the time the Doctor became the Emergency Command Hologram the crew had a high degree of trust in him, even though there was still some wariness regarding the idea.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
3,661
3
0
Massachusetts
#90
7x11 "Shattered" - The ship encounters an anomaly which 'shatters' it into a number of different time periods, and only Chakotay can move between them to set things right. Oh, how I wanted to like this one! The premise has so much potential, and nearly capitalizes on it at the end when the entire crew from different time periods gangs up on the Kazon in engineering, and a glimpse into the future with Naomi Wildman and Icheb... it's just too bad the rest of the episode is full of dull expository scenes of Chakotay explaining the last seven years to Janeway. Oy.

7x12 "Lineage" - Torres struggles with memories of her childhood, and attempts to genetically alter her child to make sure she doesn't suffer the same problems. This is a pretty shocking episode, I'm not going to lie; when it's revealed that Torres actually violates the Doctor's programming, Picardo's performance sells the whole thing. I wouldn't have really expected these writers to push this episode that far, but they did, and bravo to them. What's always been cool to me about the relationship between Paris and Torres is that she's always worried about hurting him or being left (because of her father) and he's always the one that's completely, 100% confident in the fact that he loves her and they can get through anything.

7x13 "Repentance" - The Doctor uses Seven's nanoprobes to treat an alien death row inmate, but doing so repairs a brain defect that allows him to feel remorse for his crimes. Another good episode here, with guest star Jeff Kober doing what he does best: playing a creepy psychopath. I also like that there's no super-fun-happy ending, too, that Iko accepts responsibility for his actions and his death sentence.

7x14 "Prophecy" - Voyager is attacked by an old D-7 Klingon warship, and discovers a group of refugees who believe Torres' unborn child may be their savior. This one started out really cool, but it sort of went downhill from there. It gets too bogged down in grumbly Klingons who want to take over the ship... and a really awkward and disturbing storyline about Neelix trying to get laid.

7x15 "The Void" - Voyager is pulled into a subspace anomaly where ships raid each other for food and supplies, and Janeway is forced to make difficult decisions to maintain her principles in order to get the crew out alive. I liked this one, too. It has some cool special effects (though that Federation fighter CG model is reused again) and the idea of Voyager forming a sort of mini-Federation is one that I wish the show had been doing more often.

(As an aside, one of the things I wish this show had done is spend a few episodes of Voyager gathering allies for some reason, sort of starting a Delta Quadrant version of the Federation. Like at the end of "Year of Hell," when Voyager found other aliens to fight against the Krenim. We hear in a few episodes about how Voyager has helped and inspired countless civilizations, but I would have loved to have seen that in a very specific storyline.)

7x16 "Workorce, Part I" - The Voyager crew are kidnapped, have their minds wiped and are put to work in an alien power plant. Another good episode, and one that sort of bucks expectations; Voyager's two-parters are usually big, action-packed event episodes, but "Workforce" is a bit quieter, taking time to develop its story and the romance for Janeway rather than just blasting away with big explosions (though there are certainly some of those in part two).

7x17 "Workforce, Part II" - Chakotay and Neelix infiltrate the alien planet to find and rescue the Voyager crew. Like the first, this is a pretty good episode. It's a bit higher on the action quotient, which is interesting because it feels like these two episodes were conceived as one, written as one and then split apart because the action rises through the first episode and into the second. If these two episodes were put together into a movie version, I think it would fare a lot better than other two-parters that tend to feel very much like two episodes put into one, rather than as a cohesive 90-minute feature.

7x18 "Human Error" - Seven experiments with having a personal life on the holodeck, but fights that her romantic infatuation with a holographic Chakotay are distracting her from her work. I like the ideas at work in this episode, but the flirtation between Seven and Chakotay never feels really organic. I don't think the two actors have much chemistry. Further, I don't really understand why now all of a sudden, Seven has trouble feeling emotions at a certain intensity. Why didn't this rear it's head any of the other times she's been in emotional situations like in "Drone" or "Child's Play"?

7x19 "Q2" - Q returns to the ship, demanding that Janeway teach his son some responsibility. Y'know, I didn't hate this one as much as I remember from first viewing ten years ago. It has some scenes that are not that great, but also some that are really hilarious. Kate Mulgrew and John de Lancie really do work well together, and scenes between Q and Janeway are typically a riot. The big problem is de Lancie's son, playing Q's son, and he sucks. Even though a lot of the dialogue written for him isn't that bad, the performance just doesn't work.

7x20 "Author, Author" - The Doctor writes a holonovel that presents the Voyager crew in a negative light. Not bad, again, with some great bits. The Doctor's holonovel is pretty friggin' hilarious. Unfortunately, this one becomes yet another discussion of holographic rights. With Barclay around, this episode would have been a perfect time to bring in a TNG other than Troi: namely, Data. This episode seems like a funnier version of "Measure of a Man," and yet the Starfleet arbiter at the end won't make the same determination about the Doctor that was made over a decade earlier for Data.

7x21 "Friendship One" - Starfleet orders Voyager to locate an old Earth probe that may have landed on a nearby planet, but discovers that the inhabitants used the technology to wipe out their own civilization. Good ideas going on here, but the execution isn't as good as I'd like. It's just a little too dull. And the end scene where Janeway says that space exploration isn't worth the life of Lt. Carey... I just can't agree with that, and I think it's an absurdly stupid thing for Janeway to say.
 

Cymro

Religious Fanatic
Nov 30, 1999
5,028
3
0
Shitsville, CF63
#91
Voyager's two-parters are usually big, action-packed event episodes, but "Workforce" is a bit quieter, taking time to develop its story and the romance for Janeway rather than just blasting away with big explosions (though there are certainly some of those in part two).
Braga was too busy "developing" Enterprise to contribute as many explosion ideas this season.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
3,661
3
0
Massachusetts
#93
The second last episode and NOW you bring up Janeways inescapable talent for saying absurdly stupid things?
She's said plenty of stupid things before, but to be a starship captain who is constantly talking about the wonders of exploring space to suddenly say that doing so isn't worth it if someone dies is like the antithesis of 'Star Trek' itself.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
3,661
3
0
Massachusetts
#94
7x22 "Natural Law" - Chakotay and Seven crash land in an alien nature preserve, but their attempts to escape could open up a native species to exploitation. It's been a while since the crew crashed anything besides the Delta Flyer. This one has a nice environmental message, and some cool special effects. But it feels very standard, and doesn't get enough time to really explore its ideas.

7x23 "Homestead" - Voyager finds a lost colony of Talaxians living in an asteroid belt who are under attack by alien miners. There are some really cool special effects here, especially the mining charge explosions and the Delta Flyer crash. In terms of the story, it rings a little hollow to me. I don't quite believe Neelix's change of heart to leave Voyager. But his goodbye scene is a nice moment for the cast.

7x24 "Renaissance Man" - Captain Janeway is abducted by aliens who demand the crew hand over the ship's warp drive. As the penultimate episode of the series, this one's pretty disappointing. Aside from a really hilarious 'death-bed' confession from the Doctor, I don't find anything about this episode all that compelling.

7x25/26 "Endgame" - Voyager discovers a Borg transwarp network that could get them home, if only they could find a way to make it through the massive fleet guarding it. Luckily, Admiral Janeway from decades in the future arrives with intel and technology to do just that. ....Just... I don't even know where to begin. This episode has so much going right for it, and then it just flies completely off the rails. The climax makes almost no sense, and the big, big moment where the crew finally gets home is glossed over without an ounce of emotional weight. The show simply ends like any other episode, without giving any kind of closure to, well, anything. Ultimately, it's just... lame. Alice Krige returns to the role of the Borg Queen and isn't given anything remotely interesting to do with it. Harry Kim's old age makeup makes him look about two decades older than the elder Janeway, which is weird.