Voyager. Oh, shit.

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
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#41
4x12 "Mortal Coil" - Neelix is killed on an away mission, and revived 18 hours later by a radical Borg procedure by Seven of Nine. But when he awakens, he grows depressed when he can't remember being in the Talaxian afterlife. It's pretty rare when a 'Star Trek' character attempts suicide, and I don't mean in the sense of sacrificing him/herself to save the ship. For that alone, this episode is worthwhile, even if the rest of it isn't particularly compelling. Some very nice special effects for the protomatter nebula, though.

4x13 "Waking Moments" - Aliens attack the ship via the crew's dreams, and only Chakotay, with his practice of lucid dreaming, can save them. Just a bad episode. Tom Paris' nightmare, in which the evil alien just floats up from beneath his shuttle and stares at him made me bust out laughing.

4x14 "Message in a Bottle" - Voyager discovers an alien satellite network that extends all the way back to the Alpha Quadrant and uses it to transmit the Doctor onto a distant Federation starship... which he discovers has been hijacked by Romulans. Despite Andy Dick being fairly annoying, this is a rather fun episode. And that Voyager has finally contacted home is a big step, the final scene is nicely played by the cast.

4x14 "Hunters" - Voyager uses the alien satellite network to download a message from Starfleet Command, but the Hirogen aren't about to let them access the satellites whenever they please. I like the episode's focus on the crew learning about their friends and family back home, especially Chakotay and Torres learning about the Dominion massacre of the Maquis and Janeway's fiance having married someone else. Once the Hirogen show up, things get less interesting and the loss of the satellite network is disappointing.

4x15 "Prey" - Voyager rescues an injured Hirogen who is hunting a member of Species 8472. It's always fun to have Tony Todd around, but this episode isn't particularly compelling. Unlike...

4x16 "The Killing Game, Part I" - After the Hirogen capture Voyager, they force the crew to participate in a series of holographic simulations, including war-torn France in World War II. Ok, let me be clear, this episode is stupid. And yet, it's also absurdly fun. The crew gets to let loose and aliens in Nazi uniforms is hilarious.

4x17 "Retrospect" - Seven of Nine accuses an arms dealer aboard Voyager of violating her and stealing her nanoprobes. I'm not sure what this episode was getting at, to be honest. Perhaps the dangers and complications of rape accusations? Certainly, things don't end well for the alien arms dealer, even though the evidence ends up clearing his name. It's the Doctor's over-eager psychoanalysis that ruins the whole thing, which is an interesting take, and his guilt-ridden request at the end is a nice scene.

4x18 "The Killing Game, Part II" - The war on the holodeck busts out into the interior of Voyager as the crew tries to retake the ship from the Hirogen, with the Nazis, Americans, and Klingons in the middle. Oh man, does this episode go off the rails or what? Throwing every kind of logic aside, this one just lets loose with Nazis roaming the corridors, Betty Grable jokes, WWII grenades enhanced with Borg technology and more. That last bit, where Seven of Nine modifies a grenade so that it will only disrupt holograms... totally absurd. And I kind of loved every second of it for that very fact. By the time the Klingons rush down the streets of France, nailing Nazis with their bat'leths, I almost couldn't handle it anymore. I was laughing too hard.
 
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Bean

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#45
I must be the only one here who didn't like it.
In terms of actual "quality" episodes, it's atrocious. Absolutely terrible.

In terms of saying "Fuck it, let's just have fun for this one" it's awesome.

If you just "ease off" for the episode, and acknowledge the fact that there's about a million and one things wrong with it, then promptly ignore them, it's great. Basically, let your standards take a vacation, and let your inner geek, fan boy go nuts.
 
Jun 13, 2006
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#46
The best thing about it is that the writers didn't hold back. They had to have known what they were writing was completely bugfuck insane, but for once they didn't try to hold back - in fact, it looks like they just said "fuck it, what else can we stick in here?"
 

Cymro

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#47
Maybe the reason I have such a hard time liking it is that looking at the rest of the series, I don't actually think the writers were able to grasp that what they were writing was stupid. Their writing style reminds me of the fan fic comics I used to make when I was a kid, like "Captain Picard takes command of a mobile spacedock with an interphase cloak that can carry a fleet of Galaxy class starships, but the cloak fucks with the warp drive and lands them at the Gamma/Delta quadrant border with half the ship is out of phase, and they discover a Borg/Dominion alliance". I didn't have the critical skills to understand what was wrong with that premise until a couple of years later when I looked back and thought "That was retarded".
 

Brikar

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Jan 1, 1970
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#48
I think the writers kind of looked over at what was happening on DS9, which was all political and serious, and essentially just said, "Fuck it; let's get high and see what we come up with." 'Voyager' does a nice job coming up with weird, bat-shit wild ideas for episodes... but it totally fails at generating any real drama, save for the occasional scene like the Doctor's daughter dying in "Real Life" or Torres finally admitting she's in love with Paris just before she passes out in "Day of Honor." Brannon Braga, for all he's reviled, is on record as saying that he was mostly just interested in having fun with Voyager - especially in the big two-parters, which became a tradition on the show - and I think he did.

Whether or not the audience did... is another story altogether.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
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#49
4x20 "Vis a Vis" - Voyager rescues an alien whose ship has a remarkable new kind of propulsion, but who hides a dangerous secret that could cost Tom Paris is life. Just a lame episode; I couldn't get into it at all.

4x21 "The Omega Directive" - When Voyager's systems shut down after detecting a strange energy emission, Captain Janeway undertakes a classified mission while trying to keep the crew in the dark about its nature. I fell asleep.

4x22 "Unforgettable" - An alien woman requests asylum aboard Voyager, telling the crew that she'd been aboard before and that she and Chakotay are in love... but no one has any memory of her. Cool idea, ironic title. There's nothing all that memorable about this episode. The script is a mish-mash of boring exposition and flashbacks that feel like afterthoughts. Andrew Robinson (Garak) directed this episode, but it's a bore; that Robert Beltran sleepwalks through his lines without an ounce of emotional conviction doesn't help, either.

4x23 "Living Witness" - A copy of the Doctor's program is found in an archaeological dig 700 years in the future on a world that believes Voyager was a vicious warship that nearly destroyed their society. Parts of this episode are very fun - specifically, the parts where the Voyager crew gets to act evil. It feels almost like a response to DS9's jaunts into the Mirror Universe, and the cast hams it up pretty well. But eventually, the whole thing kind of falls apart. Certain things like the fact that 700 years has gone by and these aliens have never again interacted with Starfleet or the Federation (which at this point is supposed to have crazy time ships and shit) is kind of lame. And all throughout the series, there's been such an emphasis put on "we can't lose the Doctor's program!" but here, apparently, there's a backup no one's ever mentioned before.

4x24 "Demon" - Desperately low on fuel, Voyager lands on a 'Demon-class' planet to collect deuterium, only to discover some kind of fluid that can mimic their DNA. Not terrible; cool idea, nice special effects. What's weird, though, is when Janeway essentially tortures the Harry Kim duplicate. It feels very wrong, because he's begging her to let him live and to stop hurting his... people?... and she's just kinda like, whatever I'll keep firing.

4x25 "One" - Seven of Nine and the Doctor are the only two who can remain awake when the ship must cross a vast, radioactive nebula. With the entire crew in stasis, Seven struggles to maintain the ship and her own sanity. I didn't care for this episode now, and I didn't care for it when 'Enterprise' ripped it off a couple seasons later, either. It literally makes no sense to me as to why the crew will die of radiation burns if they're awake, but will be totally okay if they just go into stasis. I'm not sure the writers even bothered trying to come up with a technobabble explanation for that.

4x26 "Hope and Fear" - A helpful alien finally decodes the transmission from Starfleet Voyager received months earlier, which leads the crew to a Federation starship waiting for them, equipped with a revolutionary new kind of engine that can get them home in just 3 months. I didn't care for this episode; as a season finale, it doesn't live up to "Basics" or "Scorpion," the fact that the Dauntless is a trap seems 150% obvious from the start... and yet that doesn't make any sense since there's no explanation for how or when Arturis created the fake message from Admiral Hayes. Ray Wise gives a fine performance, but other than that, this one wasn't all that exciting.

5x01 "Night" - Voyager attempts to cross a vast expanse devoid of any stars or planets, causing severe cases of cabin fever amongst the crew. But they're not alone in the dark... I actually like this one quite a bit. It works almost like a second pilot, with the crew having to make a similar choice again to get closer to home or to save some innocent aliens. This time, they get to have their cake and eat it, too, along with some very nice special effects. The scenes during the alien attack are pretty cool, since they're set in total darkness, not the usual 'Hollywood' darkness where you can see everything anyway. No, the director wisely chose to shoot the entire scene with the only lightsources being the characters' flashlights, which is cool. There are also some nice long, single takes in this one that are well-done, too.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
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#50
5x02 "Drone" - A transporter accident merges Seven's nanoprobes with the Doctor's mobile emitter, creating a 29th century Borg drone. This episode's not bad, it has some very nice special effects and a decent musical score. The real failing is the actor playing the drone flat-out sucks. It's a stilted, almost comically lame performance. The scene where he dies is somewhat effective, but really only because it's one of the few times Jeri Ryan is allowed to display some emotion.

5x03 "Extreme Risk" - While the crew races to construct a new ship to rescue a downed probe from a Malon freighter, Torres suffers from depression and makes increasingly risky excursions on the holodeck. Another decent episode; a nice look at Torres' reaction to last year's contact with the Alpha Quadrant. The Delta Flyer is a cool ship, and the idea of a space race is a good one for an episode; it's just too bad that it's the B-plot of this episode.

5x04 "In the Flesh" - The crew investigates a space station with a massive recreation of Starfleet Headquarters on it, populated by aliens impersonating humans. A pretty interesting turn for Species 8472. Ray Walston is a fun presence, even if he's not the real Boothby, and it's a nice 'Star Trek' lets-make-peace-with-our-former-enemies kind of episode.
 

Bean

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Jan 1, 1970
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#51
4x23 "Living Witness" - A copy of the Doctor's program is found in an archaeological dig 700 years in the future on a world that believes Voyager was a vicious warship that nearly destroyed their society. Parts of this episode are very fun - specifically, the parts where the Voyager crew gets to act evil. It feels almost like a response to DS9's jaunts into the Mirror Universe, and the cast hams it up pretty well. But eventually, the whole thing kind of falls apart. Certain things like the fact that 700 years has gone by and these aliens have never again interacted with Starfleet or the Federation (which at this point is supposed to have crazy time ships and shit) is kind of lame. And all throughout the series, there's been such an emphasis put on "we can't lose the Doctor's program!" but here, apparently, there's a backup no one's ever mentioned before.
Yeah, the two things that stuck out for me during that entire episode were no mention of further contact with the Federation. At the TNG DS9 VOY time frame don't they have something crazy like 1/4 of the galaxy mapped? And that's over what? 250 to 300 years? (and I think I'm being generous without checking the actual time lines). You would think that after 700 years they'd have made it "back" to the Delta quadrant, if not colonized it entirely.

And the idea that the doctors program can be 100% perfectly copied completely and totally takes away from the character. Sure, the doctor is a unique and sentient form of life (Like Data) but hey, we can copy the shit right out of him if we have to.
 

Cymro

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#52
5x02 "Drone" - A transporter accident merges Seven's nanoprobes with the Doctor's mobile emitter, creating a 29th century Borg drone. This episode's not bad, it has some very nice special effects and a decent musical score. The real failing is the actor playing the drone flat-out sucks. It's a stilted, almost comically lame performance. The scene where he dies is somewhat effective, but really only because it's one of the few times Jeri Ryan is allowed to display some emotion.
The same dude who played the main Nazi in "The Killing Game" and the Enterprise Nazi episode. Another reason I didn't like "The Killing Game" was that I found him so annoying.

Memory Alpha
 

Bean

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#53
Hey, he was in Carbon Creek. That's one of two episodes of Trek that I've never watched all the way through. A Night in Sickbay and Carbon Creek. Both Enterprise episodes.. who woulda thunk...

Although it is kinda cool that he played a Nazi in two episodes of Trek in different 2 series.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
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#55
And the idea that the doctors program can be 100% perfectly copied completely and totally takes away from the character. Sure, the doctor is a unique and sentient form of life (Like Data) but hey, we can copy the shit right out of him if we have to.
I don't think it takes away from the character, really, since he IS a computer program and programs can be easily copied.

As much as I like the Doctor, I think they go too far trying to humanize him. In "Living Witness" he actually struggles to remember someone's name, which honestly is a little bizarre to me since he's a computer program.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
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#56
5x05 "Once Upon a Time" - Neelix tries to distract young Naomi Wildman from learning the truth after the Delta Flyer crashes on a barren world with her mother aboard and gravely injured. Yikes. It's not like this episode is bad, really, it's just absurdly flat. The bright, colorful magical forest scenes are deadened by Voyager's workman-like production style and musical scoring. What should be sort of whimsical and fun is just dull, despite some decent acting. The young girl playing Naomi is a good choice; she's never annoying or whiny, though obviously older than the character is actually supposed to be. I suppose I should be a little thankful to this one, though. I watched John Carpenter's "The Thing" last night and it was fucking horrifying, so I needed something really harmless afterward and this certainly is that.

Oh, and one more thing: The actor playing the 'tree monster' Treevis is...
 

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Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
3,661
3
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#57
5x06 "Timeless" - Voyager attempts to create its own quantum slipstream drive with disastrous results, killing the entire crew save Chakotay and Harry Kim. 15 years later, those two are fugitives from Starfleet on a mission to rewrite history. My absolute favorite episode of 'Voyager'! I really enjoy alternate futures and timelines, and this one is a lot of fun. The episode is quite well directed by TNG vet Levar Burton, who even gets a cameo appearance as Geordi. The special effects for the Voyager crash are freaking awesome. The editing back and forth between the present and the future at the climax is clever. This episode is just a blast.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
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#58
5x07 "Infinite Regress" - Seven begins to experience multiple personality disorder after Voyager finds the debris from a wrecked Borg cube. The highlight of this episode is that Jeri Ryan gets to step out of her little Borg box. One of the things I've found most frustrating about the character is that when she first appeared, she was much softer - she wasn't forcing her voice deeper and she displayed more outward emotion in her first couple of episodes. Of course, whenever your'e playing a new character, it can take a little while to finally nail it all down, but by the end of the fourth season, Seven seemed less human than when she started. So whenever Ryan gets to do something different, I enjoy it. The climax of this episode is a cool idea, but poorly directed - Tuvok once again throws out a mind-meld and the next five minutes is essentially: "SEVEN!" "COMMANDER!" "SEVEN!" "COMMANDER!" "SEVEN!" "COMMANDER!" "SEVEN!" "TUVOK!" It was aggravating.

5x08 "Nothing Human" - After an alien creature attaches itself to Torres, the Doctor creates a holographic consultant to help him figure out how to remove it. But the crew is horrified to discover that the man he created is a Cardassian war criminal who slaughtered thousands of Bajorans. I just didn't understand the point of this episode. The consultant is essentially a database with a basic personality grafted onto it from some old history files. It's not really Krell Moset, but they treat him like he is and talk to him like he is. The Doctor even asks him if the charges against him are true, but how the fuck is the hologram supposed to know that since it's based only on the limited files in Voyager's computers?

5x09 "Thirty Days" - Tom Paris breaks the Prime Directive to save a massive ocean found floating in space, and is demoted to Ensign and sentenced to 30 days of solitary confinement in the brig. I liked this one a lot. It has a cool premise, a nice little environmental message and some really cool special effects. The scene with the Delta Flyer vs the big alien electric eel is fun. I also liked Tom's frustration over spending 30 days without any luxuries.

5x10 "Counterpoint" - Voyager attempts to transport telepathic refugees across an area of space controlled by an alien race where telepaths are sent to work camps. This episode is pretty well-written and has a nice twist at the end, the only thing that ruins it is the performance of the guest star playing the evil alien inspector. He's so cheesy and over-the-top that I couldn't get into it. And Voyager loses two more shuttles. How many of these things do they have?

5x11 "Latent Image" - The Doctor discovers evidence that his memory has been tampered with, and begins to suspect that the crew is conspiring against him. I liked this one a lot. Though it suffers from the "halfway through it becomes a Janeway episode" problem, it's still pretty well written and a cool idea for the Doctor. And, unlike "Living Witness," it accepts the fact that the Doctor is a hologram and uses that both as a strength and a weakness. Here, the Doctor is able to copy parts of his memory to use in case the primary gets erased. Ultimately, the solution to the problem accepts that he is both a hologram... and a sentient being capable of making choices.

5x12 "Bride of Chaotica!" - Photonic aliens from another dimension mistake the holodeck for reality, forcing the crew to play out a Captain Proton scenario to keep them from destroying Voyager. This episode is ridiculous, but it's clear that the cast is having a lot of fun. Behind the scenes, too, as they use some camera angles and movements that are outside the norm for this show's production. All the over-acting and terrible dialog is hilarious, and Satan's Robot is a total hoot.

5x13 "Gravity" - Tuvok, Paris and the Doctor are stranded on a world inside a subspace anomaly where time moves at a different speed. One of the few Tuvok-centric episodes that doesn't annoy the piss out of me. The actor playing the young Tuvok does a better job than Tim Russ, and guest actress Lori Petty is fun to have around, even if her character isn't particularly deep. Voyager loses another shuttle.
 

Cymro

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#59
5x09 "Thirty Days" - Tom Paris breaks the Prime Directive to save a massive ocean found floating in space, and is demoted to Ensign and sentenced to 30 days of solitary confinement in the brig. I liked this one a lot. It has a cool premise, a nice little environmental message and some really cool special effects. The scene with the Delta Flyer vs the big alien electric eel is fun. I also liked Tom's frustration over spending 30 days without any luxuries.
This is also one of my favourites for largely the same reasons. The water planet is just an interesting concept that I've never seen on film before (like the Dyson sphere), and I've always wanted to see them take a spaceship underwater. I also liked the fact that they actually demoted Paris, though sadly that didn't really mean anything (as far as I remember), and he got promoted back before the end of the series while poor Harry stayed an Ensign.

5x10 "Counterpoint"
Hated it. I can't remember why, but I think I just found it boring.
 

Brikar

The Dude
Jan 1, 1970
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#60
I also liked the fact that they actually demoted Paris, though sadly that didn't really mean anything (as far as I remember), and he got promoted back before the end of the series while poor Harry stayed an Ensign.
They pay lip-service during the episode that Janeway is considering making another officer the chief of the helm instead of Tom, but nothing ever comes of it. I don't remember when it is that he gets re-promoted to LT, I think season six. But yeah, poor Harry... Tuvok gets a promotion, Tom gets one, half the crew is given field promotions ahead of him even though they're Maquis... Harry Kim is the Geordi La Forge of Voyager - he gets shit on for 7 years. Sure, Geordi got promoted from helm to chief engineer, but man, I've never seen a character treated so poorly on such a regular basis.